Search

10 Top Tips for More Retweets

Carly Wise // 20th September 2016
Shares

If you’re serious about boosting your Twitter following and getting more retweets, then you’re going to need to know how to craft great Tweets! Here are 10 quick tips to help you lift your retweet game:

  1. Link it up
    Twitter users love links! Tweets that include links to useful or interesting content generate significantly more retweets than those that do not. It also matters where in the tweet you place the link; studies show if you position a link 25% of the way in to the text, you’ll attract more clicks.
  2. Use images
    We all know visual content is king on all social platforms, so it stands to reason that tweets with images are likely to do better than those without. In fact, they’re 94% more likely to be retweeted.The brain processes visual information faster than text, so a well-placed image will draw more attention and more retweets. FYI: images on Twitter should always be: 440 x 220 pixels.
  3. Size is everything
    Yes, you have 140 characters to work with, but how many characters you use actually goes a long way to determining retweet-appeal.For optimum engagement, aim for between 71 and 100 characters. Tweets under 70 characters get less interaction. No more than 100 means you have 40 characters for comments your retweet-ers might want to add.
  4. Word choice
    Too much self-interest is a big turn off, so avoid “me, me, me” and make your Tweets topical or about your followers. Worth noting, being polite goes a long way.Even though the list was compiled a few years ago now (by Viral Marketing Scientist Dan Zarella at Hubspot), the top 20 most retweetable words still apply:keywordsimage
  5. Get topical
    Twitter is the social platform favoured by news, sport and political enthusiasts so, logically, content is most likely to be retweeted if it plays into this niche.Hubspot says 80% of retweeted content is about news, and over 50% of retweeted content is entertainment-related.
  6. Don’t be boring, emotional or stupid
    Hubspot calls it “idle chit chat”.Avoid it!Don’t answer Twitter’s “What Are You Doing?” prompt. Unless you are a Kardashian, odds are your followers will not be interested in your daily activities.Negative emotions gain the least traction, so don’t live tweet your nervous breakdown and please, avoid over the top swearing.Spelling and grammatical accuracy is incredibly important and steer clear of excessive abbreviation; obvs (see: stupid).
  7. Know your optimum tweeting time
    Enough said? Otherwise your tweet may as well be a billboard in the desert. There is a wealth of third party help available out there for this, our recommendation is Hootsuite or Buffer.
  8. Practice makes perfect
    If you’re new to the tweeting game, draft your tweets. It often helps to jot down what you want to say in full before attempting to condense it into 140 characters. Until you get into the swing of things, write down two or three versions and then pick the best.
  9. Mention people!
    Mentioning prominent (relevant) accounts is a surefire way to instantly improve your “shareability”.
  10. Hashtag properly
    Less is more. Embracing hashtags and using them strategically is one of the best ways to enhance visibility beyond your followers and widen the net of those who can follow and retweet you. Hashtags are particularly useful in topical tweets, especially current news and events. Do your research and see what hashtags will work best for you.
References
https://audiense.com/12-tips-craft-tweets-will-get-retweeted/
http://cdn2.hubspot.net/hub/53/file-13207809-pdf/docs/science-of-retweets-201003.pdf
The following two tabs change content below.

Carly Wise

Managing Director at Wise PR Consulting
New Mum. Fremantle-phile. News nerd. Writer of words. Personal motto: "Having it all? It's a work in progress!" From journalism to boutique and corporate agency, now off on her own (thanks in no small part to economic conditions unforgiving of agency employment), Carly is living it up in the content era.

Latest posts by Carly Wise (see all)

LEAVE A COMMENT

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *